The Classics: Fab Four of Estate Planning Mistakes

  1. “I’m not wealthy so I don’t have an estate: Everyone has an estate.  Estate planning is about what you own, not just what everything is worth.  If you have a car, a house, a bank account, or anything, you have an estate.  Estate planning encompasses how you plan for the distribution of your assets.  Estate planning can be a simple will, or it can be complicated trusts.
  2. Pets. Legally, pets are your personal property.  As with all property, you should plan for what will happen to them if you die.  Obviously this takes on critical importance with pets, since so many pets end up in cages in shelters when their owners become incapacitated or when they die.  Include instructions for the care of your pet in your will, or set up a pet trust.
  3. Designation of agents, naming of executors and trustees. Most clients do not want to “play favorites” with naming their children as agents to powers of attorney, executors in a will, trustees to a trust, so they want to name all three (or however many) children as “co-“ agents.  Under some states’ laws, co-agents can act independently of each other without requiring signatures on everything of, say, all three children.  This can still be a nightmare.  Financial institutions prefer one person for their own liability reasons.  Unless there’s an odd number to break a tie, disagreements can hamper efforts to care for an incapacitated parent or deal with estate matters.  If all three signatures are required, this can be burdensome if all three children live in separate states.  Choose one child—typically the closest geographically and most responsible financially—then list other children as successors.  (Choosing a guardian for your children is crucial also.  See this important post.)
  4. Buried or cremated? Where? Besides arguments over the distribution of belongings, the other main creator of arguments is decisions surrounding burial, cremation, and cemetery location.  Be absolutely clear in your estate plan about what you want.  Do you want buried?  If yes, in what cemetery?  Do you want cremated instead?  If yes, do you want your ashes scattered (and where), or stored in an urn (and with whom)?  Fights occur because of cemetery location first, since extended family want you in your hometown even if you’ve lived away for decades.  Disposition of your body is the second cause of fights, in my experience.  Some people are abhorrent to thinking of a loved one decomposing in a grave, or being reduced to ashes in an oven.  Finally, if you choose cremation and want your ashes scattered, be sure your wishes are legal.  The wish to “throw my ashes up in the air as you’re going down Space Mountain at Disney World” is not legal.

Contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com to discuss your will or trust, or planning for your pet.

Students with Disabilities: Sect. 504 Plans Can Be Critical

A student who has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is a student who has a disability that is impeding the student’s ability to learn.  Not every disability impedes the ability to learn, however.  Examples might include having diabetes, cancer, epilepsy, using a wheelchair or crutches.  If your child has a disability that does not impede her ability to learn (meaning no IEP), what law protects her if she needs an accommodation?  Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.  It is more relevant than ever.

I’ve heard Sect. 504 plans called IDEA-lite (IDEA is federal law controlling IEPs) because it gave “something” to students with disabilities who don’t qualify for IEPs.  A student with a disability, but where his or her ability to learn was not affected, would often get a health or nursing plan.  For example, a child with diabetes would receive shots at certain times.  These plans, unlike IEPs, lacked enforceability.  Parents had to rely on the good will of the school to see that accommodations or services were provided in such a health or nursing plan.

That changed with new ADA regulations (affecting Section 504) and clarification from Congress that students with disabilities are entitled to evaluation to determine if a Sect. 504 plan is necessary.  In fact, the Office for Civil Rights held that a school placing a child on a “health plan” violated the law by not evaluating for a Sect. 504 plan, in violation of the district’s child-find mandate.

Why does it matter that the school must evaluate for a Sect. 504 plan, even if it puts the child on the country’s best individualized health plan?  Accountability.  Procedure.  Remedies.  The best individualized health plan is only beneficial if it is fulfilled, if procedures are adhered to.  If this very-best-health-plan isn’t followed, then there is no enforcement mechanism.  There is no federal (or possibly state) law to turn to for holding the school accountable.  To the contrary, if a Sect. 504 plan is not followed, the school can be held accountable under federal law, and remedies can be sought under federal law.  We want to believe that our child’s school will do what it agrees to do, but we also want a law to invoke if the school doesn’t.

Contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com with any Sect. 504 or special education questions.