Divorce–special considerations for when a child has special needs

Divorce with a special needs child–the special considerations that need addressed by divorcing parents, their attorneys, and courts could fill a book.  This much-shorter blog post will try to shed light on why this topic requires more careful attention.

Divorce is a difficult and painful process for everyone involved.  Parents must work out arrangements for custody, visitation, and child support.  Standard child support “tables” or calculations, and general “parenting plans” spelling out visitation, guide most divorcing parents in making their decisions.

“Standard” or “general” guidelines, tables and plans are to be assessed carefully, however, when the divorcing parties have a child with special needs.  A typical child support calculation, or standard visitation schedule, might be completely inappropriate for situations where a child has disabilities.  Why?

Visitation often includes alternating weeks, or weekends, where a child goes back and forth between parents’ homes.  For a child on the autism spectrum, for example, such a disruption in routine might be unbearable and ultimately unworkable.  Or, if a child with a disability requires durable medical equipment that cannot be transported, one parent might have to visit their child where the equipment is located—in his or her ex-spouse’s home.  The child’s interests must come first, and in these situations, working out visitation can be tricky.

Child support for a child on varying medicines, therapies and treatment programs that might not be covered by insurance cannot be calculated by standard tables.   Child support payments might need to be made to a special needs trust to avoid disqualifying the child from receiving means-tested benefits (typically, Medicaid).

Spousal support for a parent who gives up his or her career to care for a disabled child—a full-time job—takes on special consideration.  Division of retirement and marital assets must account for the parent who forfeited his or her earnings potential and social security credits to serve as caregiver for a disabled child.

This post mentions only a few of the myriad of issues that are presented with divorcing parents who have a child with a disability.  Parents, their attorneys, and courts need to assess what special needs exist, how to address what is needed, and how to incorporate those needs into visitation, custody, and child support.

If you are considering divorce and have a child with special needs, feel free to contact me with any questions at julie@juliemillslaw.com.

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