10 Essential Steps to Start a Nonprofit (cont’d)

Step #9: Money and People!

You have completed most legal steps to forming your nonprofit, now it’s time to start the steps that help truly launch your organization, i.e., money and people.  Securing funding, forming partnerships—these steps will put your group in a position to accomplish your goals.

  1. Fundraising: know your state’s laws on fundraising that involve gambling or alcohol. Keep detailed financial records of the funds you receive.  If your events involve minors or animals, have waivers and releases ready!  Inquire when you need insurance for events.  Obtain the correct permits and permission from local authorities before your event.  If you are serving or selling food, be sure to check with your local health department and other agencies to see if you need to provide information.  This list is not exhaustive.
  2. Grants: educate yourself, your grant committee if you have one, and others who want to help with grants, on grant writing and the grant application process.  How you present your organization when applying for a grant affects how grant funders view your organization.  They are determining whether to give your group money from the application you submit.  Are your financials in order?  Are your goals and mission clearly described?  Are you organized, which implies trustworthiness with the money they give to you?
  3. Corporate sponsorships: one thing I learned when trying to identify potential corporate sponsors is that you want to look beyond what the corporation does and sells.  For example, animal related nonprofits tend to approach animal-related companies, e.g., pet food, pet supply, pet boarding companies.  This leaves out a potentially large source of funding.  A large contributor to local pet charities in my town is a basement foundation and repair company.  Another large sponsor of animal rescue-related charities in my area is a laptop repair and sales business.  Expand your outreach with companies!
  4. Partnerships: other organizations can be one of your greatest assets. Leverage your contacts in forming partnerships.  The food pantry you start would get much public view if you partner in an event with a group who fills bookbags with food to provide weekend meals for kids who suffer from food insecurity.  Contact organizations who might benefit from your group, and who might provide a benefit to yours.
  5. Media: send the word out to local media about your group, your events. Become familiar with preparing media releases.  Connect with Facebook groups, prepare a content calendar for posting on social media such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, etc.

Information about grant writing, fundraising, partnerships and related topics could fill a book.  The information above should serve to get you started in launching your organization’s work.  I’m happy to answer any questions–contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com.

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