Happy “National Entrepreneurship Week”!

This week, February 15-22, 2020 is National Entrepreneurship Week (#NatlEshipWeek).  The U.S. has 30 million small businesses and entrepreneurs.  There is never a better time than now to start a business, and Ohio is a great state for business.  I posted on this blog on starting a business, the Small Business Administration offers a helpful guide, as does the Ohio Secretary of State here, and Ohio offers advice here.  So many of my clients who have started their businesses are going strong, and I hope you have the same success.  Here is my post from January 24, 2019, Starting a Business in Ohio:

The first of the year typically brings clients wanting to begin the new year by starting a business.  I enjoy working with people who want to pursue their dreams, whether it is working for themselves, or turning a hobby into income, or providing a product or service to others.  In addition to filing forms and preparing organizational documents, my role as your attorney is to take all steps necessary to protect you and your assets from personal liability.

The necessary actions in starting a business in Ohio will vary according to what type of business you’re starting.  Basic steps include:

This list is not exhaustive.  If you have employees, you should contact the Ohio Bureau of Worker’s Compensation and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services to determine any steps you need to take.  Certain businesses will need to obtain special licenses and permits, particularly if your business involves preparing and selling food.

If you want to discuss starting your own business, contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com.  It is never too late to become an entrepreneur in business-friendly Ohio.

Before you die…

Or this post could have been titled “Ease the burden of loved ones.”  Because I’m an estate planning attorney, the “Before you die…” advice I’d typically give would be to have a will or living trust plan prepared.  I certainly always recommend that advice.  This post, however, is different.

I recently read an article I loved, “You Need to Make a ‘When I Die’ File–Before It’s Too Late.”  The article speaks to the side of estate planning that I rarely participate, and that’s the grieving family part of planning for what happens after you die.  I help my clients get all the documents they need, and advise on decisions that need made.  What struck me about the suggestions in this article though were actions to take that speak to people you love.  The article adds two items to the typical estate planning checklist, i.e., an ethical will and letters to loved ones: “[W]here a legal will transfers assets, an ethical will transfers immaterial things: your life lessons and values.”

An ethical will supplants a traditional will, and might be used to explain why you chose one child to serve as executor over the other child, or why you chose close friends as guardians for your child over your siblings.  “Letters to loved ones” is self-explanatory, and I highly recommend it if you have children who might have difficulty remembering you if you die when they are young.

As the author states:

The point of all this is to make a difficult thing like dying or loving someone who is dying less difficult. In that sense, creating a When I Die file is an act of love. It will always be too soon to tell your story and let people know how much they mean to you, until it is too late.

If you have any questions about estate planning, email me at julie@juliemillslaw.com.