When should I update my estate plan?

An estate plan consists of a last will and testament, possibly a trust, along with additional documents necessary for situations involving incapacity or death.  Additional documents can include a financial power of attorney, advance directives (living will for end-of-life decision making, and a healthcare power of attorney), and a funeral declaration, among other documents.

You should review your estate plan every five years to see that it still reflects your wishes.  However, if any of the following occur, then you should review your estate plan sooner:

Marriage: if you get married, or particularly if you get re-married, you need to review your estate plan.  If you are married and die without a will, state laws of “intestacy” (dying without a will) might not result in a distribution of your assets as you would want.  Furthermore, divorce and re-marriage do not automatically remove your ex-spouse from existing documents.

Children (birth, adoption or marriage):  the critical reason for reviewing an estate plan after you add a child to the family is to name a guardian who will care for your child should you (and your spouse, if married) die.  This is not a decision that should be left to a judge you do not know.  Another reason is to direct assets to provide for your child if you are gone.

Divorce: many states have laws that treat ex-spouses as having “predeceased” their divorced spouse in certain situations with some estate planning methods.  It is best to not assume that such a law will pertain to your documents. Part of your divorce or dissolution journey should include an estate plan that removes your ex from your documents.

Death of a spouse: if a spouse dies, you want to be certain that you have successors listed in estate planning documents, and you want to update deeds and titles to property.  For example, if you have a financial power of attorney and your spouse is the only person you named to serve as agent, you will need to update this document with the names of others.  If you owned property jointly with your spouse, you will need to remove your spouse’s name if you intend to convey that property (you’ll need to have a new deed prepared to your home).

Change in assets:  when you acquire assets, you should ensure that your estate plan addresses where those assets will go upon your death.  If you have 8 acres that your two children will inherit and plan to divide equally, and then acquire 5 more acres, who will inherit the 5 acres if you do not specify it in your estate plan?

Relocation:  most estate plan documents are valid in other states if you move, as long as the documents were executed properly in the state where you lived when they were prepared.  There are special considerations in some instances, however, when you move.  For example, if you move from a community property state to a common law property state, or vice versa, then you should definitely have your current estate plan reviewed by an attorney in your new state.  Additionally, bond might be required for out of state executors and others, so you might consider choosing in-state people to serve in these fiduciary roles.

Change in status of guardian, trustee or executor:  did the person you named as the guardian of your child die?  Move to Europe?  Become incapacitated?  The same consideration is valid for an executor or trustee.  If yes, consider reviewing your documents to remove them and replace with alternatives.  Perhaps after you named your cousin to serve as the guardian of your three children, she has had four children—would she be able to care for seven children?  After you named your brother to serve as guardian of your child, he started a career where he travels more than he is home—would that be a suitable situation for your child?

Your estate plan reflects your wishes for the way everything will be handled at your death, and designates certain people to carry out those wishes.  Both the plan, and the people designated in the plan, should be current.

Contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com to discuss reviewing and updating your estate plan.

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Elderly parent and assisted living

A friend is facing the prospect of having to consider assisted living for her mother.  “Mother” is friendly, enjoys people her age, and although she loves all five of her grandchildren she does not want to live with them.  She wants to remain at home but, because of dementia, she needs a “memory care” facility.  She finally agreed to other living arrangements after forgetting about a pan of food frying on the stove and nearly burned her house down.

Addressing these issues before there is an immediate need for assisted living is preferable because an elder law attorney can work with you to qualify for Medicaid without losing much of what you own.  To qualify for Medicaid you must have no more than $1,500 in assets.  What you have, after considering exempt assets and other factors, must be “spent down.”  Taking this journey without an attorney is, in this attorney’s opinion, a poor decision.  Many people who decide to apply for Medicaid sell their home, mistakenly believing it will be taken–it is typically an exempt asset.  Unfortunately, then, the proceeds from the sale of the home (an asset that was previously exempt) are then a countable asset which will increase the amount you must spend down.

Takeaway: if a loved one will be entering a nursing home or assisted living facility, and will need to apply for Medicaid, consult with an elder law attorney.  The money you pay for the attorney’s counsel will likely not come close to the money and assets you will protect if applying for Medicaid.