Barebones planning for life without you.

Some people plan for their death and the fate of loved ones, whether it’s by a will, trust, re-titling and re-deeding assets, or other ways.  These are my clients.  Other people do not do this planning, and the reasons are typically because 1) they don’t want to think about it, 2) they don’t have the time or money for it, 3) they think others will take care of everything if they die.  These are many of my family members and friends.

Frankly, people die, their loved ones do take care of everything, and life goes on.  But, if you practice probate and estate administration as I do, you see so many situations where loved ones are left trying to “take care of everything” in impossible or contentious situations, where families fight and relationships become extremely strained, or irreparably damaged.

What if you do not want to engage in any estate planning–for any number of reasons, you don’t want to have a will or a trust prepared.  At least not yet.  However, you do see the need to provide some guidance to loved ones should you die.  There are very basic steps you can take to provide this guidance.  It goes without saying that I always recommend a will or trust, but something–barebones planning–is better than nothing.  I guarantee you it would be appreciated.

The following is a list you can do, on your own, to make the lives of your loved ones easier if you die.  Some steps are specific to Ohio, where I’m licensed to practice.  Tailor to your own situation:

1.  Children: if you have children under 18 years old, write down 3 people in order of priority who you would choose to raise your children (guardian).  Sign it in front of two unrelated witnesses.

2.  Funeral: disagreements over your final disposition are common.  Write down whether you want buried or cremated.  If buried, name a cemetery.  If cremated, what happens to your ashes?  List two people in order of priority who will be in charge of decision-making and with making sure your wishes are followed.  Sign it in front of two unrelated witnesses, or have it notarized.

3.  Medical decision-making:  name a person and 2 successors to be in charge of decisions about your medical care if you cannot make them.  Explain your wishes about artificial life support–do you want kept alive by artificial means?  Sign it in front of two unrelated witnesses.

4.  Pets: please provide for their fate if you die.  Many family members take pets to shelters after their owner dies.  Who do you want to care for your pet?  List two successors after this person.  Will you leave them money to help with the care?  How much?  Sign it in front of two unrelated witnesses.

5.  Specific bequests:  do you have possessions that you want to go to specific people?  List the items, and to whom they go.  Sign it in front of two unrelated witnesses.

This list is not exhaustive, but it covers the areas where I see fighting among relatives.  Having guidance during a time of grief is a gift.

If you have any questions about this post, or about estate planning, contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com.

 

When to say goodbye to pets

A sizable portion (surprising to some) of my law practice is pet estate planning.  Whether it’s preparing a will and designating someone in it to care for your pet if you die, or creating a pet trust for your pet (recommended), or adding provisions to an existing will or trust, people see pets as family and plan for them as they do their children or other beneficiaries.  People engage in pet estate planning for everything from one dog, to a stable of horses, to parrots who often live to age 60 or 70.  (Blatant plug–I was one of the first Ohio attorneys to publish an article on pet estate planning after the change in Ohio law that permitted it.  I wish everyone planned for their pets in this way, and I’m happy to help with documents and, or, letters of intent regarding their care.)

As difficult as it is to plan for a day when we might not be able to care for our pets, it is incredibly difficult to know when it is time to humanely let our pets die.  How do you know when it’s time to let them go?  That decision is fairly easy when there’s visible suffering, but the signs aren’t always so clear.

Veterinarian Alice Villalobos, DVM created a scale that can help guide pet owners in deciding whether euthanasia is appropriate.  If you score higher than 35 on the scale, then perhaps supportive care is appropriate instead of euthanasia.  Whatever your score is on this scale, my suggestion is to discuss everything with your veterinarian.

If I can help you plan for your pet should something happen to you, please email me at julie@juliemillslaw, or visit http://www.juliemillslaw.com for additional information.

Trusts–4 things they do that you might not know

A trust is an estate planning tool where the grantor (person who creates the trust) transfers assets to the trust to be managed by someone they choose as a trustee.  Transferring assets to a trust is accomplished in many ways, but largely by re-deeding or titling.  For example, John Doe transfers the deed to his house from “John Doe” to the “John Doe Trust.”

Here are 4 things trusts do that you might not know:

  1. Protect beneficiaries. Children and grand-children are typical beneficiaries in estate planning to protect their futures. Trusts can preserve assets to children by distributing certain amounts at certain ages, such as distributing one-third of the assets at age 25, another chunk at 30, another final chunk at 40 or any age.  Staggering distributions to a child ensures they are taken care of to an extent through a certain period in their life.  If you have only a will, assets go to beneficiaries once they reach 18.
  2. Provide for beneficiaries with special needs. People with special needs often need government benefits such as Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for healthcare and necessities. Special needs trusts ensure that a disabled beneficiary can have assets without disqualifying him or her from receiving government benefits.
  3. Provide for pets. Trusts can ensure the care of your pets by naming people (a caregiver) to care for your pets, and providing funds to ensure that your pets receive care.  The Humane Society of the United States estimates that over 100,000 pets are taken to shelters each year after an owner dies, and in areas with large elderly populations, half the pets in shelters end up there due to their owner’s death.
  4. Encourage certain values. Trusts can provide incentives for pursuing a post-secondary education, encourage community service or productivity, support home ownership, encourage long-term savings and planning.  You cannot condition distributions to beneficiaries on anything that violates public policy, but providing matching funds or financial support in certain circumstances can be a way to reward values that are important to you.

Contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com to discuss setting up a trust.

What happens to my pet if I die?

Provide for the care of your pet through a pet trust to avoid your pet’s fate falling into the hands of people you do not choose.  A pet trust is a legally enforceable way to provide care for your pet if you die, or become incapacitated and unable to care for your pet.

“I have a provision in my will for my dog.”  Your will comes into play after you die.  What if you became incapacitated from an accident, injury or illness?  Your will would not help, but a pet trust would.  Your trustee and pet’s caregiver could step in and begin caring for your pet if you become incapacitated and unable to take care of your pet.

“I’ve left money to my sister and she has agreed to take my cat if I die.”  What happens, however, if your sister would die shortly after you, or die before you and you never update your will, or if she otherwise becomes unable to care for your cat?  If you had a pet trust, your successor caregiver would step in and care for your pet.

A big difference between a pet provision in your will, versus having a pet trust, is timing.  With a will, your executor can’t make distributions until your estate has gone through probate, and money for your pet’s caregiver might be unavailable for months, or longer if there are any issues with probate.  With a pet trust, your trustee has access quickly to trust funds, and can provide money to the caregiver for your pet’s needs.

A pet trust is like most trusts where you name a trustee and successor trustees to manage the assets of the trust; you name a caregiver and successor caregivers to physically care for your pets; and you fund the trust, typically with your assets at your death or with a life insurance policy with the trust as the beneficiary.

If you live in Columbus, Cleveland, Akron or Canton, and areas in between, and want to provide for your pet’s future without you by preparing a pet trust, email me at julie@juliemillslaw.com, or call me in northern Ohio at (216) 438-1298 or central Ohio at (614) 519-8661.

The Classics: Fab Four of Estate Planning Mistakes

  1. “I’m not wealthy so I don’t have an estate: Everyone has an estate.  Estate planning is about what you own, not just what everything is worth.  If you have a car, a house, a bank account, or anything, you have an estate.  Estate planning encompasses how you plan for the distribution of your assets.  Estate planning can be a simple will, or it can be complicated trusts.
  2. Pets. Legally, pets are your personal property.  As with all property, you should plan for what will happen to them if you die.  Obviously this takes on critical importance with pets, since so many pets end up in cages in shelters when their owners become incapacitated or when they die.  Include instructions for the care of your pet in your will, or set up a pet trust.
  3. Designation of agents, naming of executors and trustees. Most clients do not want to “play favorites” with naming their children as agents to powers of attorney, executors in a will, trustees to a trust, so they want to name all three (or however many) children as “co-“ agents.  Under some states’ laws, co-agents can act independently of each other without requiring signatures on everything of, say, all three children.  This can still be a nightmare.  Financial institutions prefer one person for their own liability reasons.  Unless there’s an odd number to break a tie, disagreements can hamper efforts to care for an incapacitated parent or deal with estate matters.  If all three signatures are required, this can be burdensome if all three children live in separate states.  Choose one child—typically the closest geographically and most responsible financially—then list other children as successors.  (Choosing a guardian for your children is crucial also.  See this important post.)
  4. Buried or cremated? Where? Besides arguments over the distribution of belongings, the other main creator of arguments is decisions surrounding burial, cremation, and cemetery location.  Be absolutely clear in your estate plan about what you want.  Do you want buried?  If yes, in what cemetery?  Do you want cremated instead?  If yes, do you want your ashes scattered (and where), or stored in an urn (and with whom)?  Fights occur because of cemetery location first, since extended family want you in your hometown even if you’ve lived away for decades.  Disposition of your body is the second cause of fights, in my experience.  Some people are abhorrent to thinking of a loved one decomposing in a grave, or being reduced to ashes in an oven.  Finally, if you choose cremation and want your ashes scattered, be sure your wishes are legal.  The wish to “throw my ashes up in the air as you’re going down Space Mountain at Disney World” is not legal.

Contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com to discuss your will or trust, or planning for your pet.

August is #NationalMakeAWillMonth!

August is #NationalMakeAWillMonth.  What are you doing to celebrate—having a will prepared this month?  Instead of discussing what happens with a will, here’s what happens without one.

When you die and you have not prepared a will, you die intestate.  The laws of “descent and distribution” in your state kick in, and the court uses these laws to decide who gets what.  The court appoints a person to administer your estate.  The court decides who will care for your children.

Without a will:

  • You don’t decide who gets what assets you own
  • You don’t dictate who winds up your affairs
  • You don’t choose who will parent your children
  • You don’t decide where your pets will go
  • You don’t decide whether you’ll be buried or cremated, or where you’ll be buried

Celebrate #NationalMakeAWillMonth by having a will prepared this month.  Take control of what happens to your assets at death!

Letters of Intent–More Information

I received several inquiries after my recent post on Letters of Intent, or instructions for guardians or caretakers of your children or pets.  I have specific forms I have developed for children, pets, and children with special needs.  If you would like pricing for those, email me at julie@juliemillslaw.com, or message me through my law office’s Facebook page.

Letters of Intent can be created by you (versus an attorney), and many parents have done just that.  These can be in-depth, broad, more limited–it’s up to you.  To guide you, here are links to three examples, all from moms who were dying of cancer:

  1. A simple, specific, instructional Letter of Intent, “Mummy Manual”:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-346306/The-mummy-manual.html
  2. An in-depth, broad, far-reaching Letter of Intent with guidance:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/10084492/Dying-mother-leaves-20-point-plan-for-happiness-for-her-family.html
  3. Letters written to child to be given at certain life moments, a series of Letters of Intent:  http://metro.co.uk/2015/07/23/mum-terminally-ill-with-cancer-writes-letters-to-her-four-year-old-to-last-a-lifetime-5308613/

What will be most helpful to your guardian?  What information will help your child the most?  The links to the different letters could be used to guide you in adapting such letters to specific situations, such as pets.

Send any questions to julie@juliemillslaw.com

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