Misconceptions you might have with estate planning

I have heard all of these misconceptions mentioned, including just today.

  1.  The attorney who prepared my will must handle my probate.  No.  Many estate planning attorneys prepare wills with an eye toward being called upon to handle a probate if the client dies, but there is absolutely no requirement that the drafting attorney who prepared your will must handle your probate.  This includes if the attorney who prepared your will holds your original will for safekeeping.
  2. My will dispenses with all of my property. Some documents override a will.  If you have a will, and you leave all real (house, land) and personal property to John, yet you have a deed that is held somehow with Jane, Jane will get the house because she is on the deed, not John, even though your will gives it to John.  Generally, titled and deeded assets go to the person listed on the title, or beneficiary designation, or deed.  “I leave everything I own to Bob.”  At my death, I have a life insurance policy that lists Joanne on the beneficiary designation.  Who gets my life insurance?  Joanne.
  3. I had a trust prepared so I don’t have to worry about probate.  It is so frustrating to see clients come to me with trusts they had prepared (and paid a lot to have prepared), only to learn that the trusts are unfunded.  What the client has, then, is a stack of papers that likely will not do what was intended.  Funding your trust involves titling or deeding assets to your trust.  You can accomplish this by naming your trust on beneficiary designations so that asset goes into your trust at your death, or having a “transfer on death affidavit” prepared that puts your home into your trust at your death.  For example, you would have a deed prepared granting your home from Jenny Jones to “The Jenny Jones Revocable Living Trust.”   However you accomplish it, a discussion of “funding your trust” should be a critical part of planning from your attorney.  If you have a trust prepared and then never prepare a new deed putting your home into your trust, and you die, your home will likely require a probate to be opened, defeating one of the important reasons for having a trust prepared (avoiding probate, privacy).
  4. A will (last will and testament) is different than a “living will.”  A last will and testament is what we think of as a “will”–we state who is to inherit what, we name a guardian for our kids if they’re young, we name an executor.  On the other very different hand, a “living will” is a healthcare document stating whether we want artificial life support if (1) we are terminally ill and death is imminent, or (2) if we are in a permanently unconscious state (i.e., brain dead).  This is popularly known as “pulling the plug.”

Contact me at julie@juliemillslaw.com to discuss estate planning.

What is a trust?

What is a “trust”?  What does it do?

There are three parties involved in a trust.  First is the person who makes the trust, called the settlor or grantor.  Second is the person who is to benefit from the trust, called the beneficiary (or beneficiaries).  Third is the person who manages the trust, called the trustee.  A trust is a contract, with terms determined by the grantor to govern how the trustee manages the trust, terms to decide how the assets in the trust are to be distributed to beneficiaries, terms to govern who is included in the class of “beneficiaries” if the beneficiaries are not clearly defined, terms to decide when the trust should terminate, among others.  Because a trust is a private contract, the settlor or grantor can decide upon whatever terms and conditions he or she wants in the trust, unless they are illegal or against public policy.

Essentially, a trust is a way for someone to control his or her assets “from the grave.”  For comparison, with a last will and testament, assets are distributed once the deceased’s debts are paid by his estate.  The administration timeframe with a will is usually no longer than thirteen months.  With a trust, the trust holds assets (typically by re-titling or re-deeding an asset) and the trustee makes distributions according to the terms of the trust, which could be at staggered ages (25, 30, 35), or to pay for college, etc., and could last for years.

There are several different types of trusts used for several different purposes.  Most of my clients use trusts to provide for children or grandchildren (pay for college, provide distributions at key ages in life), or they have a child or grandchild with a disability and they want to leave assets to their disabled loved one to maintain their quality of life, without jeopardizing government benefits.   Other common trusts include credit shelter trusts, life insurance trusts, domestic asset protection trusts, firearms (“gun”) trusts, pet trusts, IRA trusts, among many others.

Trusts have certain benefits that clients find attractive.  Unlike wills, which are public documents and can reveal private information including finances, a trust is not a public document.  Privacy can be a big concern for those wishing to keep certain things private, such as business owners and their finances.  Trusts, if properly funded, avoid the probate process.  In some situations, trusts can protect assets from creditors.  Particularly important for many of my clients (as mentioned above), trusts permit someone to control the distribution of their assets from the grave, often for years.

This blog post is a very general and condensed explanation of the benefits of a trust.  If you are interested in learning more about how a trust might benefit you, email me at julie@juliemillslaw.com or contact me via http://www.juliemillslaw.com.